Arizona Kayak Fishing Basics

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  • Introduction to Kayak Fishing

    If you enjoy paddling, either from a kayak or canoe, you know the tranquility it brings when you are out on the water. If you are one that enjoys fishing, which means you are a patient person, you should know the peace of mind it brings to you and the challenges it takes to catch a fish. The combination of paddling and fishing is one that is not only enjoyable if you like both, but kayak fishing has many benefits over other types of fishing platforms. apache-kayak.jpg

    As you probably already know, kayak fishing is becoming a very popular sport, not only in America, but worldwide. There are more and more fishing tournaments starting up for kayak fishing throughout the United States as well as other countries, which show that kayak fishing has become a big sport and continues to grow in popularity. Not only is tournament fishing on kayaks becoming big, even for the recreational angler, it is becoming very popular. Hopefully, in Arizona, the sport will be big enough to have sponsored Kayak Fishing Tournaments.

    Some of the reasons the sport has become so popular is because it is low maintenance. Once you have the equipment you need, there really isn’t too much to spend on, unless you want to have all the fancy gear and always have the latest and greatest items for your kayak and for kayak fishing. There is nothing wrong with that.

    Benefits of Kayak Fishing
    1. Getting to the fish locations that are not accessible by just fishing on the shore and getting to hard to reach places where motor boats cannot venture through.
    2. Able to fish different ways: trolling; bait fishing; or casting and retrieving lures as in bass fishing.
    3. You can take a break from fishing, and can paddle for exercise while enjoying the scenery.
    4. It’s cheaper than owning a boat with a motor (gas or battery powered). No need to fuel up, worry if the engine is going to start, no annual registration to deal with (some cities do require permits for their water systems)
    5. When trolling, it is a lot quieter than some trolling boats.
    6. Easier to store and maintain than regular fishing boats.
    As you have probably noticed, kayak fishing is becoming very popular worldwide. There are quite a few magazines that are dedicated to the sport. Not only are kayak fishing tournaments appearing across the nation but they are popular worldwide as well. There are several kayak manufacturers that are designing their kayaks more and more towards kayak fishing and some new manufacturers that are just dedicated to fishing kayaks. This guide is going to provide you all the basics that you really need to know to get into the sport

    The Basics of Kayak Fishing

    If you have never kayaked before and plan on purchasing your first kayak for fishing, here are some recommendations:

    • Ensure you will enjoy the sport before purchasing your first fishing kayak:
    • Rent one out or borrow a friend’s kayak and try it. You do not want to invest into this sport and purchase a kayak, only to find out it really isn’t for you.
    • Decide on the type and brand of kayak you want:
      • There are several brands and models out there. And there are two types of fishing kayaks:
        • Sit inside or cockpit kayaks
        • Sit On Top (SOT) kayaks.
    Kayak Style
    There are some benefits for each model, so you will need to decide which one would suit your fishing style.

      • SOT Kayaks – The sit on top model is probably the more popular style of fishing kayak. They offer more maneuverability for the angler by allowing the angler to stand on them for some models and you can sit sideways on them, allowing you to get your feet wet, especially if the weather gets hot. There are some kayak models out there that allow you to stand on them comfortably, for fly-fishing or for just stretching out. SOT’s allow more type of fishing equipment to be installed on them to ensure you have all the proper gear that you would like to have. SOT’s also have hatches or cargo areas to keep items dry. There are some SOT’s that have features especially made for kayak fishing. Some have peddles for hands free fishing and some have features where they section out, forming a tripod type of kayak for added stability, especially if you will be standing up to fish. The fishing kayaks that are stable enough to stand on are popular for fly-fishermen.
      • Sit In or Cockpit Kayaks – These types of kayaks feel more stable, when sitting in them, because you sit closer to the water and have a lower center of gravity. Most sit in kayaks have a narrower beam (width) which make them quicker, but takes away from stability. The Sit In Kayaks are probably more suited for colder weather climate because they can keep your legs warmer, especially when you include a “skirt” to enclose the hatch around your waist.
      Depending on your height and weight, make sure you choose a kayak that will fit you and one that you will feel comfortable on or in. This is one good reason to rent one or try a friend’s kayak, to make sure you are comfortable.

      Factor in the size of the kayak for storage and transportation modes as well. Before you purchase a kayak, decide on how you plan to store your kayak and how you plan to transport your kayak from home to water and back. Determine if you have space to store them where you are living. There are some mounts designed to store them by hanging them off the ceiling, hanging them off a wall or kayak shelves specifically designed to hold two or more kayaks. As far as transporting your kayak, there are manufacturer’s that design kayak racks for the top of standard cars and SUVs. If you own a pickup truck, there are various options for transporting your kayak or kayaks as well.

      For kayak fishing, there are several brands and models of fishing kayaks that are being sold with molded rod holders. This is a very convenient feature for fishing kayaks. When shopping for one, make sure the rod holders are in a place that is comfortable for you. The rod holders should be in a place where they will be out of the way for paddling.

      Go to a seminar on kayaking
      There are probably some seminars for kayakers in your area for - safety, paddling, transporting, equipment, fishing, etc. Check you local sport stores like REI, Sports Chalet, Sport’s Authority, or local outdoor shops and maybe some local venues like your city’s Park and Recreation Department, who should provide these types of seminars in your home town.
    • Check with Arizona State’s regulations on boating as well as the Game and Fish regulations for your state:
      • Verify if a license is required for a kayak or not. Currently, Arizona does not require you to register a self-propelled water craft.
      • Find out where you can or cannot operate a kayak. Most lakes and rivers in Arizona do not require permits or registrations for use. Places like Tempe Town Lake does require a permit. The Indian Reservations may require a permit as well. Read up on the Rules and Regulations for the use of kayaks on their land before heading out.
    Safety
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    Safety is very important when kayak fishing. There are several items that should be followed when participating in this sport. Here are the safety items that you should be aware of when kayak fishing:

    • Always wear a Personal Floatation Device (PFD) or in layman’s terms, a life jacket. Believe it or not there are quite a few people who paddle, but do not know how to swim. Some people get comfortable when kayaking and if they do know how to swim, they opt not to wear their PFD. This is not suggested.
    • If you do not know how to swim, take swimming lessons. You can never be too old to learn. Sign up at your local community center or take private lessons.
    • Other Items to have for safety other than your PFD – a whistle, a knife, a strobe flashlight, a mirror, waterproof 2 way radios, a safety kit with the necessary items like band-aids, aspirin, allergy medicine, sunscreen and you should have leashes to secure yourself and items to your kayak in the event you roll over. More on leashes later.
    Basic Boat Rules
    • When on the water, make sure you follow your basic boat rules, especially on crowded waters. If going head on with another boat, steer to the right just like you would do when driving a vehicle on the road.
    • If fishing at night, have the proper lighting. Some lakes have the same lighting regulations as standard boat rules. Basically, you should have a green light on the front right side and a red light on the front left side as well. Some paddlers tape red and green cyalume glow sticks that can be purchased from most sporting good’s camping section. This is the cheapest way for proper bow lighting on a kayak. Also, a white light must be on the rear of your kayak that can be seen from a 360 degree view. There are some kayak lights on a shaft that are being sold which fit in the molded rod holders of fishing kayaks. It’s also always a good idea to have a flashlight or headlamp with you as well when kayaking at night. Another good recommendation is to use strategically placed reflective tape on your kayak and paddles as well.

      Kayak Safety
      • Learn how to get back in your kayak if you ever fall out or turnover. One of the benefits of a SOT Kayak is that it is easier to get back on. If you have a Sit In Kayak, it will fill with water if you turn over. If you do not know how to roll your kayak in the event you do go over to one side, then part of the process of getting back in is turning it back upright then draining it before getting back in. If you have a SIK, have a siphon pump available and sponges to take water out. Learn how to roll your kayak if you decide to get a sit inside kayak. Some people learn how to roll their SOT, which is much harder, but it can be done. Practice in a pool or shallow water where it is at least shallow enough where you would not hit your head on the lake floor.
      • Try to have a kayak fishing partner when heading out. You never know when you might need help, especially if you fall off your kayak or turnover. Your partner will make getting back in, much easier. Learn how to work with your partner on how to rescue each other.
      • Always try and stay center and balanced, especially when landing a fish. There is always a tendency to lean over when landing a big fish.
      • Launching your kayak is probably one of the most challenging and dangerous parts of kayak fishing. The percentage of tipping over in your kayak is greater when you are launching. Learn how to enter your kayak properly. Learn how to get out of your kayak properly. Most basic kayak seminars will teach you how to perform these actions properly.
    KAYAK EQUIPMENT
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    To make your kayak adventure more enjoyable you should have the proper kayak equipment that will make it so. Here is a list of necessary items to keep in or on your kayak.

    This is my Hobie Revolution at Alamo Lake – It has the accessories to make fishing simple end enjoyable. Fish Finder, Rod Holders, Fishing Net, Kayak Cart, and an anchor pulley for drift net or an anchor.

    For Sit On Top Kayaks here are some recommended items:

    • Scupper Plugs - Most Sit On Top Kayaks have scupper holes for drainage of excess water coming into the kayak. I would recommend getting some scupper plugs to plug some of those holes, especially the ones that are under the seat area. Most Sit On Tops have them located under the seat.
    • Seats – some Sit On Tops come with seats built into the kayak. Make sure it will be comfortable for you, because depending on your fishing trip, you could be sitting for awhile.
    For Sit In Kayaks here are some items that are necessary:

    • Bilge Pump – in the event you get excess water in your sit in kayak or you do roll it, getting the water out will be easier with a bilge pump, once the kayak is back upright.
    • Bilge sponge – once in awhile you do get a small amount of water in your sit-in kayak. Sometimes it gets uncomfortable sitting in that water. A quick way to clear that water out is with a sponge. Carry a good sized one to make bailing quicker.
    • Cockpit skirt – some paddlers with sit-in kayaks like using skirts around their hatch to keep excess water out of the cockpit. It also will keep your legs warmer if fishing in colder weather. Some cockpit skirts have zip up pockets or compartments to store items for quick access.

    For both Sit On Top and Sit In Kayaks:

    • PFD (Personal Floatation Device) or Life Jacket – The most important item when paddling is your life jacket. There are many different styles to choose from. For most anglers they want to use one that will be out of the way to free their arms and shoulders for comfort. Some use self-inflating PFD’s in this case. For other anglers, they like pockets on their PFD for their fishing gear. Make sure you get one that you are comfortable with and one that you will not want to take off when kayak fishing.
    • Paddles – an important necessity for your kayak is a paddle. Usually, kayaks are not sold with paddles. So when picking one out, I recommend the lightest one you can afford. I would also make sure that it floats and one comes apart. Make sure it is the correct length for your kayak. A good rule of thumb for sizing the correct size paddle is to stand the paddle next to you. If you can raise your arm and it extends past the length of the paddle, it is too short. If you raise your arm and the tip of your fingers cannot reach the end of the paddle, it is too long. The correct sized paddle is one where the paddle is as long as you are with your arms raised and you are able to curl your fingertips just over the length of the paddle. If you get a paddle that is too long, when you do paddle, the steering of your kayak will have a tendency to go side to side. If you get one that is too short, you will get tired of paddling a whole lot faster.
    • Dry Bags and Boxes – Dry bags will help keep items that you do not want to get wet from getting wet. Some anglers take extra clothes and food that they would like to keep dry. For those anglers who like to take electronics with them, like: phones, cameras, GPS’s, radios, MP3 players, etc., there are some dry boxes sold for those items. A preference is to make sure they float, in case the boat does flip over and everything falls out. Dry bags can be kept in the cockpit areas of sit in kayaks and for SOT’s, use dry bags that can fit inside the hatches of your kayak or that can be strapped comfortably to locations on top of the kayak on the bow or aft of the kayak.
    • Cameras and Video Cameras – Most paddlers like to take pictures of places they have visited as well as record their adventures. When kayak fishing, what better way to record your trophy fish than with a picture or video recording of the catch. There are several waterproof models out there. Or if you already have a camera, some companies sell waterproof casings for some.
    • Kayak Cart - For transportation of your kayak from your vehicle to the water, you should have a good dolly or kayak cart. Take into consideration the type of terrain you will be wheeling your cart across. If you will be going through sandy beaches to get to the water, a cart with nice wide tires will help. Thinner tires will sink in the sand and will make it really tough to pull or push your kayak and cart through it. Get one that is durable. There are some cheaply made ones out there and could break easily if not strong enough to handle rugged territory or heavy kayaks with equipment on them. Review the specifications of the cart you plan to purchase to see if it will handle your needs.
    Necessary Kayak Items
    To make your kayak adventure more enjoyable you should have the proper kayak equipment that will make it so. Here is a list of necessary items to keep in or on your kayak.

    Sit on Top Kayaks
    • Scupper Plugs - Most Sit On Top Kayaks have scupper holes for drainage of excess water coming into the kayak. I would recommend getting some scupper plugs to plug some of those holes, especially the ones that are under the seat area. Most Sit On Tops have them located under the seat.
    • Seats – some Sit On Tops come with seats built into the kayak. Make sure it will be comfortable for you, because depending on your fishing trip, you could be sitting for awhile.
    Sit In Kayaks
    • Bilge Pump – in the event you get excess water in your sit in kayak or you do roll it, getting the water out will be easier with a bilge pump, once the kayak is back upright.
    • Bilge sponge – once in awhile you do get a small amount of water in your sit-in kayak. Sometimes it gets uncomfortable sitting in that water. A quick way to clear that water out is with a sponge. Carry a good sized one to make bailing quicker.
    • Cockpit skirt – some paddlers with sit-in kayaks like using skirts around their hatch to keep excess water out of the cockpit. It also will keep your legs warmer if fishing in colder weather. Some cockpit skirts have zip up pockets or compartments to store items for quick access.

    For both Sit On Top and Sit In Kayaks

    • PFD (Personal Floatation Device) or Life Jacket – The most important item when paddling is your life jacket. There are many different styles to choose from. For most anglers they want to use one that will be out of the way to free their arms and shoulders for comfort. Some use self-inflating PFD’s in this case. For other anglers, they like pockets on their PFD for their fishing gear. Make sure you get one that you are comfortable with and one that you will not want to take off when kayak fishing.
    • Paddles – an important necessity for your kayak is a paddle. Usually, kayaks are not sold with paddles. So when picking one out, I recommend the lightest one you can afford. I would also make sure that it floats and one comes apart. Make sure it is the correct length for your kayak. A good rule of thumb for sizing the correct size paddle is to stand the paddle next to you. If you can raise your arm and it extends past the length of the paddle, it is too short. If you raise your arm and the tip of your fingers cannot reach the end of the paddle, it is too long. The correct sized paddle is one where the paddle is as long as you are with your arms raised and you are able to curl your fingertips just over the length of the paddle. If you get a paddle that is too long, when you do paddle, the steering of your kayak will have a tendency to go side to side. If you get one that is too short, you will get tired of paddling a whole lot faster.
    • Dry Bags and Boxes – Dry bags will help keep items that you do not want to get wet from getting wet. Some anglers take extra clothes and food that they would like to keep dry. For those anglers who like to take electronics with them, like: phones, cameras, GPS’s, radios, MP3 players, etc., there are some dry boxes sold for those items. A preference is to make sure they float, in case the boat does flip over and everything falls out. Dry bags can be kept in the cockpit areas of sit in kayaks and for SOT’s, use dry bags that can fit inside the hatches of your kayak or that can be strapped comfortably to locations on top of the kayak on the bow or aft of the kayak.
    • Cameras and Video Cameras – Most paddlers like to take pictures of places they have visited as well as record their adventures. When kayak fishing, what better way to record your trophy fish than with a picture or video recording of the catch. There are several waterproof models out there. Or if you already have a camera, some companies sell waterproof casings for some.
    • Kayak Cart - For transportation of your kayak from your vehicle to the water, you should have a good dolly or kayak cart. Take into consideration the type of terrain you will be wheeling your cart across. If you will be going through sandy beaches to get to the water, a cart with nice wide tires will help. Thinner tires will sink in the sand and will make it really tough to pull or push your kayak and cart through it. Get one that is durable. There are some cheaply made ones out there and could break easily if not strong enough to handle rugged territory or heavy kayaks with equipment on them. Review the specifications of the cart you plan to purchase to see if it will handle your needs.
    KAYAK FISHING EQUIPMENT
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    Scalling a 19 inch catfish caught at tempe town lake with a measuring stick

    Accessorizing your kayak for fishing is a fun challenging aspect for those getting into the sport. There is such a thing as over accessorizing for a hobby you love. The saying, “You can never have enough” does not hold true for this sport. You do want to have all the proper equipment for kayak fishing. You do not want to have a “Swiss Army Knife” of equipment for this sport. Depending on the type of fishing you will be doing, accessorize appropriately. You do not want to weigh your boat down and have too many devices and accessories that they just get in the way. Other than your rod, reel and tackle, here are items for your kayak that can make your kayak fishing experience more enjoyable:

    Electronic Kayak Fishing Accessories
    • Fish Finder – depending on the type of fishing you will be doing, a fish finder can give you an edge on finding fish in unknown territory. Some fish finders will provide the temperature of the water and the depth. Mounting a fish finder is just a small challenge. Decide on the best location to mount your fish finder on your kayak. Make sure it will be out of your way when paddling.
    • GPS – Some anglers like to track their fishing trip and pinpoint spots they have fished. A GPS device can make it easy to get back to your favorite spot on a lake. Some GPS devices can record your trip and the path you had taken to your destinations. Make sure if you do get a GPS, ensure that it is waterproof.
    • 2-Way Radios – 2 Way Radios are recommended when fishing with a friend, which is also recommended. Communication is a key part to enjoying kayak fishing when you are with a friend. Telling your partner what lures are working, how deep to fish, what type of lure retrieval is working will make the kayak fishing experience much more enjoyable. Also, 2-Way Radios make it easier to communicate with each other, rather than having to paddle over to your fishing partner to talk or yelling at the top of your voice across the water. Probably the most important feature of a 2-Way Radio is for safety. In the event you get lost or you get injured and you need assistance, the 2-Way Radio can help in these types of scenarios. Again, like the GPS, make sure you find 2-way radios that are waterproof.
    • Electric or Trolling Motors – Some anglers like to free their hands when fishing. Mounting an electric motor or trolling motor can provide hands free fishing and can make you less tired at the end of your fishing day. There are some electric motors made specifically for fishing kayaks. If you do mount and use an electric motor, make sure you will still meet all weight requirements of your kayak and know how deep the water is below you, when using an electric motor, so you do not damage the equipment.
    • Bait Tanks and Live Wells – Most anglers who use bait tanks are big game fish anglers. Anglers going for game fish using live baitfish as lures for their game will want to mount a bait tank on their kayak for their bait. Live wells are designed to keep your catch fresh and alive. Depending on the size of fish you are going after, make sure you get a live well big enough to contain the live fish and to keep them from getting harmed. There are some live wells and bait tanks out there that fit specific kayak models or you can make your own with a 5 gallon bucket. Since live wells run on batteries, ensure the battery casing is waterproof and it does not add to much weight to your kayak.
    Non-Electric Kayak Fishing Accessories
    • Leashes – Probably the most important kayak fishing accessory that you have will be a leash. Try and have a leash for every loose item on your kayak. This includes rod leashes, a paddle leash, a leash for your net, dry bags, etc. In the event you roll your kayak, you do not want to lose your kayak and fishing equipment to the depths of the waters you are fishing.
    • Rod Holders – If you like to fish with more than one rod, which most experienced angler’s do, than if you do not have any rod holders made on your kayak, purchase one or two or three! Depending on the type of the fishing you are doing, rather than spending time rigging up one pole, have other rods already rigged and ready to cast when the fish are biting. There are many ways to mount rod holders on your kayak, especially for those kayaks that do not come already with molded rod holders. Just ensure that the rod holders are not mounted so that they get in the way while paddling.
    • Fishing Net – One can never be without a good telescopic or extending fish net. The preference is for one that collapses for easy storage and preferably one that would fit in one of your rod holders. Don’t forget to attach a leash to your fishing net to your kayak in case you roll.
    • Anchors and Drift Nets – When bait fishing, anchors and drift nets are great to have, especially when it is windy and the currents are strong. If you want to keep your kayak in one specific location, lower your anchor down until there is slack on the rope. This will mean you have hit bottom with the anchor. Secure the rope to your kayak and you are ready to fish your spot. A good tip when using an anchor is to have a piece of foam on the end of the rope that floats. In case you catch a fish and you do not want it to get tangled to the anchor rope, you can simply release the anchor rope and the end will float off while you reel in your catch. Once you have caught your fish, you can paddle back to the floating rope and secure it back to your kayak. There are also some pulley kits for kayaks that allow you to move the anchor or drift net from one end of your kayak to the other.
    • Milk Crates – One of the cheapest items to store most of your kayak fishing gear is with a milk crate. Milk crates can be customized for the type of fishing you do. From mounting PVC pipes for rod, net and gaff holders to holding live bait wells or fishing tackle, the milk crate is very adaptable to your needs. Some stores sell outfits to fit milk crates so that they cater to your needs as well. Make sure you properly secure your milk crate to your kayak and all the items in the crate in case you do roll your kayak. You do not want to lose all your tackle and equipment that you had stored in it.
    • Measuring Stick/Ruler – Some anglers like to measure their catch for recording purposes or if they are fishing tournaments where they go by measurement. There are some rulers out there that you can mount to your kayak, out of the way but in a location where you can easily record your catch.
    • Pontoons – For a more stable fishing kayak, an angler has an option to add pontoons on each side of their kayak. They sell kits for this option. Pontoons will provide an angler the ability to stand on their kayak with more confidence.
    • Compass – a compass can be mounted to your kayak so that you can tell which direction you are heading. Once in awhile, when big lake fishing, you can get disoriented. By using a compass, you can get your bearings back and feel comfortable and out of danger.
    Types of Kayak Fishing

    There are different types of kayak fishing, from fishing rivers and ponds, to small and big lakes here in Arizona. Most anglers should know their environment and know what type of fishing is popular in the area. Most sport sections of local newspapers have fishing reports to let the public know what fish are biting and what they are going after as far as baits and lures. Use these reports as a source of knowledge for your area. Interested kayak anglers have probably seen anglers from shore and from powered boats working the waters, trying to catch fish in their area. Fishing from a kayak brings you something in between those types of fishing but probably more similar to fishing from a powered boat but being able to get to those hard to reach places that shore anglers have access to. From a kayak, you have the ability to troll, fish in one spot or to fish parallel to shoreline or structures, like largemouth bass fishermen do. Depending on the fish species you are going after, one of these methods will work better than the other. The object is to find which methods work the best for any particular type of fish, any type of structure and any type of water that you will be fishing (rivers or lakes).

    Kayak Fishing on Rivers
    Kayak fishing on rivers is probably the hardest from of kayak fishing because of constantly moving water. An angler must have the right type of kayak, preferably a shorter model for better maneuvering. They must also know how to read a river. Depending on the speed of the flow of the river drifting with lures or baits is the best way to fish rivers. Plan your trip appropriately when fishing rivers. If you plan to start upstream and drift a good distance downstream, you will need a partner and two vehicles for shuttle services. Drop one vehicle at your endpoint of your river trip. From upstream where the passenger vehicle is, you should have all your kayak and fishing equipment ready to go. Launch upstream and drift away while enjoying the scenery and fishing at the same time. Once you reach your endpoint where the shuttle vehicle is, land your kayaks, load them up then head back upstream to the other vehicle. This is the basic process for fishing flowing rivers.

    Kayak Fishing on Lakes
    Kayak fishing on freshwater lakes is the easiest form of kayak fishing. An angler can use all kinds of techniques for fishing a lake. Here are 3 basic techniques when fishing freshwater lakes:

    • Trolling a lure is a favorite way to fish a lake from a kayak. When trolling, let about 25 yards of line out with your lure, sit your rod in a rod holder or a location in your kayak where it will not be in the way of paddling your kayak. As you paddle, keep an eye on the rod tip for any bites or snags. If snagged, you will see you rod tip bend with no wiggles. To retrieve the lure from a snag, keep the line tight and turn you kayak around back towards the snag. Go past the snag and see if your lure becomes free. If not, try wiggling the line to see if that works. Usually when going back like this, the retrieval of a lure from trolling is pretty high. If the lure is not retrievable, it’s not a big loss. Tie another one back on and troll away.
    • Working the shoreline for feeding fish. This technique is better used in the early morning hours and late afternoon hours when fish tend to fish along the shoreline for baitfish or insects. By paddling your boat parallel to the shoreline, (or you can drift, if the wind or current is flowing in a direction parallel to the shoreline) cast your lure towards the shoreline and retrieve it. There are various ways to retrieve lures depending on the type it is. Learn how to use various lures for various types of fish.
    • Bait fishing is the other form of fishing from a kayak. Depending on the type of fish you are after, either bottom feeding, suspended or surface feeding fish, use various methods of bait fishing as you would from shore or a standard motor powered boat. You can either anchor your kayak if you find a hot spot or drift with the current or wind, depending on the speed of either one to search for hot spots and cover more water with your bait.
    Study and know the hot spots and the hard to reach areas of a lake. There are some topographical maps of lakes, showing points to fish off, deeps areas, underwater channels, etc. If there are no maps available, a fish finder would be recommended but not necessary.

    Conclusion
    Depending on what part of the state you live, near rivers or lakes, kayak fishing can be experienced by anyone willing to try something new and exciting. Hopefully this guide has answered all your basic questions about getting involved with the sport. Try and go with someone experienced on your first trip, so they can teach you some of the basics in person. They should be knowledgeable of the area for the type of fish and fishing that can be done from a kayak. Plus it is always a good idea to go with a partner. Kayak fishing can also be a fun family outing. It is affordable and if you do not own kayaks, more and more parks with lakes and beaches are starting to rent them out. Be safe, have all the necessary equipment required and you should have a great experience.

    Have fun and tight lines!

User Comments

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  1. HookedAZ
    Thank Ed. Think I'm going to have to get a Kayak. Seems like something I can get into. I have a buddy that drives folks to the top of the Verde river and pics them up below the town of Verde. All my buddies that got kayaks are hooked on it for fishing and whitewater.
    1. Ed Elefante
      You would enjoy it, Tom!
      Ed Elefante, Oct 31, 2016
    2. HookedAZ
      I went out with my buddy up in Lake Powell on his Kayaks. It was awesome. I'm not very graceful at getting the fish in the kayak yet. I think I need a small net next time.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dqhMqD5FzTU
      HookedAZ, Oct 31, 2016
  2. Sit in Kayak
    When talk about water sports, we talk about the kayaking on blue water surface. Learn kayaking with entry level kayaks and sit in kayak to enjoy adventurous outing. The great thing about sit on kayaks is that they are highly comfortable and easier than boats or yachts.